Monday Muscle Of The Week

Welcome to Monday muscle of the week this week we are looking at the Pectoralis Major and Pectoralis Minor

 

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Pectoralis Minor

The pectoralis minor is a muscle that becomes easily shortened and tight due to many factors, including rounded shoulder posture, glenohumeral joint dysfunction, breathing dysfunction, and a variety of compensation patterns. The pectoralis minor is a downward rotator of the scapula and oftentimes involved in glenohumeral dysfunction. The pectoralis minor is also an internal rotator of the humerus.

 Origin

3rd to 5th ribs near their costal cartilages
 

Insertion: 

Medial border and superior surface of coracoid process of scapula


Action:

Stabilizes scapula by drawing it inferiorly and anteriorly against thoracic wall
The pectoralis minor has two main functions. On one hand, it pulls the scapulaanteriorly and inferiorly toward the ribs (abduction and depression respectively). This leads to a dorsomedial movement of the inferior angle of the scapula. This movement is both helpful when retracting the elevated arm and as well as moving the arm posteriorly behind the back. On the other hand, the pectoralis minor elevates the third to fifth ribs (given a fixed scapula) and expands the ribcage. By those means, it can also serve as an accessory muscle during inspiration.

 

PECTORALIS MAJOR

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Along with the pectoralis minor, the pectoralis major forms the anterior wall of the axilla.

ORIGIN

Clavicular head: medial half or two- thirds of front of clavicle, Sternocostal portion: front of manubrium and body of sternum. Upper six costal cartilages. Rectus sheath.

ACTION

Adducts and medially rotates humerus.Clavicular portion: flexes and medially rotates shoulder joint, and horizontally adducts humerus toward opposite shoulder. Sternocostal portion: obliquely adducts humerus toward opposite hip.

Pectoralis major is one of the main climbing muscles, pulling the body up to the fixed arm.

BASIC FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT

Clavicular portion: brings arm forward and across body, e.g. asin applying deodorant to opposite armpit.Sternocostal portion: pulling something down from above, e.g. a rope in bell ringing.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Clavicular portion: local pain, radiating to anterior deltoid and long head of biceps brachii area. Sternal portion: “acute” back pain into anterior chest wall in a 10–20 cm patch of diffuse pain around medial border of upper extremity. Stronger pain below medial epicondyle in a 5 cm patch, diffuse pain into 4th and 5th digits.

Costal portion: 5th and 6th ribs leads to severe cardiac referral (even at night). Intense breastpain (10–15 cm patch). Diffuse radiations into axillary tail, and into axilla.

CAUSES

Poor posture while sitting, round- shouldered postures, heavy lifting, chilling of muscle in air conditioning, immobilization of shoulder or arm in cast or sling, anxiety and poor breathing, sports overload (e.g. weight training, rowing, boxing, push-ups).

 

 

 

Stress Less Saturday !!!

Stress less Saturday

 

Hope you have had a stress free week but chances are you had at least a little stress happening!!

So this week I’m changing it up a little, this week the FIVE tips are all around food!!!

 

Sip Green Tea


Instead of turning red with rage and getting flustered, get green with a cup of herbal tea. Green tea is a source of L-Theanine, a chemical that helps relieve anger (It does an excellent job at relaxing without being a sedative). Boil the water, pour it out, and take a soothing sip.

 

Honey


Besides being a natural skin moisturizer and antibiotic, honey also provides compounds that reduce inflammation in the brain, meaning it helps to fight depression and anxiety. So if your feeling stress add a little sweetness to your day with  some Honey.

 

Mango give it a try!!!


Use a five-minute break to bite into a juicy mango, which packs a compound called linalool that helps lower stress level. Don’t fret about the juice dripping down your chin—the stress relief is worth the mess. Take a tropical vacation without leaving the desk chair. Give it a go…..

 

Crunch a Crunchy Snack


Sometimes there’s nothing more satisfying than crunching on a a fresh piece of fruit when we’re stressed—one study found stressed adults craved crunchy and salty snacks more than usual while stressed. But that salty crunch doesn’t have to be so sugary—a handful of trail mix, a juicy apple or a bag of celery sticks will work just as well.

 

Chocolate

 

Anyone who knows me had to know this one would pop up somewhere……
Just a square of the sweet stuff can calm your nerves. Dark chocolate regulates levels of the stress hormone cortisol and stabilizes metabolism. But if your like me you already knew chocolate will help you to de-stress……. I might have 2 squares while I’m at it.

Thanks for reading Stress less Saturday hope you are enjoying the reads please feel free to leave a comment. Have a stress less week!!!!

 

 

 

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Tuesday Stretch Of The Week!!

Subscapularis stretch

To be able to stretch a muscle correctly, you first need to know the action of the muscle. As I said in Monday’s blog the subscapularis Medially rotates the arm at the shoulder (glenohumeral) joint. So to stretch the subscapularis you need to do the opposite

 

Muscles being stretched in picture are as follows:

Primary muscles: Pectoralis major. Subscapularis. Teres major.   Secondary muscle: Pectoralis minor. Anterior deltoid.   

Technique

Stand with your arm out and your forearm pointing upwards at 90 degrees. Place a broomstick in your hand and behind your elbow. With your other hand pull the bottom of the broomstick forward.

 

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Monday Muscle Of The Week #Subscapularis

Welcome To Monday Muscle Of The Week!!!

 

Subscapularis

 

This week is the forth and final rotator cuff muscle the Subscapularis.

A quick refresher the rotator cuff muscles and their tendons act as stabilisers to the shoulder, Subscapularis A member of the rotator cuff, which comprises the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint. The subscapularis constitutes the greater part of the posterior wall of the axilla.

ORIGIN

Subscapular fossa and groove along lateral border of anterior surface of scapula.

INSERTION

Lesser tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

ACTION

As a rotator cuff muscle, stabilizes glenohumeral joint, mainly preventing head of humerus being pulled upward by deltoid, biceps, and long head of triceps. Medially rotates humerus.

Antagonists: infraspinatus, teres minor.

BASIC FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT

Example: reaching into back pocket. 

REF: This information was sourced from Muscles of the body and their trigger points niel asher healthcare as the copyright 2014

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Stress Less Saturday! #3

Welcome to the third week of stress less Saturday…..

How was your week?

Mine was amazing it was the first week for All About Muscles being open in the Taree location.

Have you tried any of the stress-less tips from the first 2 weeks of Stress Less Saturday?

This week as you can imagine I had a little stress going on, but nothing to overwhelming thank goodness. I met some amazing new people throughout the week and I’m thankful for that.

What did I do to distress this week: Listened to music, did some yoga, got out side and walked, spent time with my Family and pets and last but not least meditation…………

Why don't you really have a think about what you did this week to distress your week?

My 5 new tips for this week are:

 

1. Get Organised

You will be surprised at how much clutter could contribute you you feeling stress or overwhelmed. So clean up the 3 stacks of filing, pop away the tape dispensers, staplers, scissors and throw away the misshaped paperclips. Take just a few minutes to reorganise your workspace leaving just what you NEED out.

2. Identify What You Can And Can’t Control

Take a minute or two and think about what is stressing you. When you identify what the issues is, think can I control this? If No let it go…..

If the answer is Yes, then do something about it easy right?

 

3. Journal

Write it down some people like to unwind by writing pages in their journal, jot down one or two lines about your day, by just putting emotions on paper you can make them seem less intimidating. But if this becomes another task on your to-do list, skip it.

 

4. Make A List Of The Day’s Triumphs

While you have pen to paper write down what your grateful for, what you have done today that makes YOU proud. This can be especially helpful for relaxing, when stressed we will focus on what’s going wrong which makes it hard to unwind. Jot down one or two good things in your day and move on to unwinding…..

 

5. Take A Quick Walk

When you’re feeling overwhelmed or having trouble concentrating, go for a quick stroll around the block, on the beach or in the park. You’ll get the benefits of alone time, physical activity, and a few minutes to gather your thoughts!

 

Thank you for reading please feel free to add comments on what works and what doesn't work for you. Not all of these work for me but may work for you. Keep an eye out for the next blog hope the ideas are helping.



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Monday Muscle Of The Week Teres Minor

Muscles Of the Week!!

 

Welcome to Monday muscle of the week this week is the third of the rotator cuff muscles the TERES MINOR, A member of the rotator cuff,which comprises the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint.

ORIGIN

Upper two-thirds of lateral border of dorsal surface of scapula.

INSERTION

Lower facet on greater tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

ACTION

As a rotator cuff muscle, helps prevent upward dislocation of shoulder joint. Laterally rotates humerus. Weakly adducts humerus. Antagonists: subscapularis, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Localized zone (2–5 cm) of intense pain in regimental badge area, with a more diffuse elliptical zone of pain spreading in posterolateral upper extremity (above elbow).

REF: This information was sourced from Muscles of the body and their trigger points niel asher healthcare as the copyright 2014

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Stress Less Saturday!!!

Stress Less Saturday!!!

 

WELCOME TO THE SECOND WEEK OF STRESS LESS SATURDAY…..

I hope everyone’s week has been a good one, Did you get a chance to read last weeks blog with ideas about how to de-stress your lift? This week I have FIVE new ideas for you to try….

Please feel free to let me know what works or what doesn’t work for you I’d love the feedback.

Let’s take a look back at the 10 from last week:

1.  FEEL THE MUSIC

2.  USE YOUR BREATH

3.  CUDDLE WITH A PET

4.  DO SOME YOGA

5.  GO OUTDOORS WHEN YOU CAN

6.  PLAY

7.  LAUGH

8.  RUB YOUR FEET OVER A GOLF BALL OR SPIKY BALL

9.  DRIP COLD WATER ON YOUR WRISTS

10.  BOOK YOUR NEXT MASSAGE.....

Did you try any throught the week?

Now lets look at this weeks 5 ideas!!!

 

1. Meditate


Five minutes of peace is all it takes to reap the benefits of meditation. Whether you are a student, a taxi driver or a busy mum, meditation will help you to deal with life’s challenges in a positive way. Meditation can lower your levels of stress and therefore have a positive effect on your body and mind. There’s evidence that just two quick bouts of silent meditation per day can relieve stress and depression. Find a comfortable spot in a quiet place, concentrate on your breath, and feel those anxieties start to disappear.

  

2. Use visualization

So for me the next step after meditation would be visualization which in itself is a type of meditation. “The brain can’t distinguish between reality and imagination, so visualization can be a powerful tool to help you unwind in a snap,” Lindor said. She suggested visualizing yourself at a favorite spot. Be as specific as you can. Note what’s around you. Are you by the ocean? Is it a calm current or are the waves crashing? Are there kids playing? Are they making sand castles or playing in the water? Is the sand white and smooth? Or is it a sparkling in the clear waters of Fiji.

 

3. Get clear on what you need to do

It’s hard to unwind when our thoughts keep returning to our endless to-do lists. Keep calm and set some time to list and prioritise what needs to be done today and the order in which to do them. THEN LET THE REST GO unit tomorrow.

4. Focus on the present moment

It’s not only natural environments that engage our senses. Take the time to listen to what’s going on around you, take in the smells, look around and take note of the little things. Is there cars around, sounds and smells of cooking, children around, animals in the yards you walk by?

5. Release the tension in your jaw

Now this is a new one for me I hadn’t read about this one before but it makes sense to me.

“Many of us carry tension in our jaw, often unknowingly,” said Guest-Jelley, also a body empowerment educator and founder of Curvy Yoga. To loosen the tension, “open your mouth wide for half a minute or so, breathing naturally through your nose. When you feel you’ve stretched a bit, allow your mouth to gently close.”

 

Well that’s my Five Ideas for this week I’ll have 5 more for you next week please keep your eyes out for the next blog. FEEL FREE TO COMMENT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday Muscle Of The Week INFRASPINATUS

Monday Muscle Of The Week!!

Welcome to Monday Muscle of the week this week is the second of the rotator cuff muscles the INFRASPINATUS, A member of the rotator cuff, which comprises the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis. The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint.

 

ORIGIN

Infraspinous fossa of scapula.

INSERTION

Middle facet on greater tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

ACTION

As a rotator cuff muscle, helps prevent posterior dislocation of shoulder joint. Laterally rotates humerus.

Antagonists: subscapularis, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Middle/upper cervical spine: deep anterior shoulder joint zone of3–4 cm in region of long head of biceps brachii, radiating into biceps belly then into forearm—diffuse symptoms in median nerve distribution.

Medial/scapula: to medial border of scapula.

ADVICE

Avoid reaching into back seat of car. Heat can be beneficial. Support arm on pillow for relief.

REF: This information was sourced from Muscles of the body and their trigger points niel asher healthcare as the copyright 2014

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Stress Less Saturday! #1

Stress Less Saturday! #1

 

Welcome to the first week of stress less Saturday…..

Most of us no what stress feels like 345 emails in the inbox, conference call starts in 5 minutes but I just covered myself in scolding hot coffee, kids have 3 different sports on Saturday in 3 different places…….

But do we really know how to stress less or really relax?

Sure a week away at a resort would calm the nerves and work for most people. But there isn’t always time for tanning, let alone sleeping, eating, or going to the bathroom.

 

I have put together 10 ideas on how to relax or stress less:

 

1.  Feel The Music

One of my favorite thing to do.

Music has been used in hospitals to combat depression and induce sleep in those suffering chronic insomnia. The Royal Melbourne Hospital uses music therapy to promote relaxation and reduce stress, even in palliative cancer patients. "Music offers opportunities for increased expression, positive experiences and an increased sense of meaning," says the hospital's Senior Clinician Emma O'Brien. Take time to listen to some of your favorite music, and your body will thank you for it.

 

2.  Use Your Breath

Is there any simpler way to relax?

We often forget to focus on the simplest, shortest (and one of the most restorative) activities available to us: our breath. Slow, deep breaths can help lower blood pressure and heart rate. Start with 5 Slow, deep breaths and as you do, notice the natural pause between your inhale and exhale, and then between your exhale and your next inhale. Your body has a built-in break — how great is that?!”

3.  Cuddle With A Pet

A boyfriend or girlfriend is okay, but they’re (usually) not furry enough. After a rough day, Snuggle with a pet for an instant slobbery smile, since pets can boost self-esteem and even ease the sting of social rejection. If your pet is anything like my Diesel you will end up with plenty of love and all slobbery for free.

4.  Do Some Yoga

Practicing Yoga is a great way to relax and centre your mind to become calm and collected.  Plus it has many, many benefits to your physical body, too. Learn a few simple Yoga poses, or asanas, and spend a few minutes every day practicing them. If you are happy with the results, you could perhaps take a class and develop your skills even further! Put your feet up—against the wall, of course. The Vipariti Kirani yoga pose involves lying on the floor and resting the legs up against a wall. Not only does it give the body a good stretch, but it helps create peace of mind, too.

5.  Go Outdoors When You Can


This won’t be very practical in the middle of winter when it gets dark by five o’clock, but in the summer, it should still be light when you get home. Take advantage of the remaining light to take a walk or enjoy another outdoor activity. Head outside and “sit on a bench or a blanket and let your mind get quiet” while you engage all your senses,” Kaplin said. Engaging your senses is a powerful way to relax, Lindor said. What do you see, hear and smell?

6.  Play

If exercising feels to much like a chore then how about enjoying some guilt-free time with your friends? In ‘Play it Away’, author Charlie Hoehn explains how spending 30 minutes each day on any outdoor activity with your friends may actually be the key when trying to cure anxiety. He even created a Pinterest board with all sorts of activity ideas you can try out. Play is a wonderful way to unwind, especially for grown-ups. Play is anything that’s purposeless and pleasurable. For instance, in her book, Louden suggests everything from finger-painting to playing tag to watching cartoons to digging in the dirt to throwing a Frisbee to going to the zoo to swinging on the swings at a park.

7.  Laugh


Stressed? Me? Ha! Laughter’s one of the sillier ways to beat stress, but there’s science behind it . A fit of hysterics can increase blood flow and boost immunity. Keep a book of jokes handy in the desk drawer or check out a hilarious YouTube video (maybe a piano-playing pug?) for a quick pick-me-up.

8.  Rub Your Feet Over a Golf Ball Or Spiky Ball


Leave the clubs at home and just bring the ball. You can get an impromptu relaxing foot massage by rubbing your feet back and forth over a golf ball, spiky ball or even a tennis ball. Most people who have been for a massage at All About Muscles Massage Therapy know how much I love the uses of spiky ball on your feet or even your back!

9.  Drip Cold Water On Your Wrists


Pass on the perfume and go with water. When stress hits, head for the bathroom and drop some cold water on your wrists and behind your earlobes. There are major arteries right underneath the skin, so cooling these areas can help calm the whole body.

10.  Book your Next Massage.....

 

A relaxation massage helps de-stress and loosen up your body and is great for those who have had a hard working week or feel like treating themselves to some TLC!  It is a pain-free way to relax both your muscles and your mind.

Welcome To Monday Muscle Of The Week

SUPRASPINATUS

This week we are starting Rotator Cuff Muscles. The rotator cuff helps hold the head of the humerus in contact with the glenoid cavity (fossa, socket) of the scapula during movements of the shoulder, thus helping to prevent dislocation of the joint. The most common rotator cuff muscle that gets injured is the SUPRASPINATUS witch is where we are starting.

ORIGIN

Supraspinous fossa of scapula.

INSERTION

Upper aspect of greater tubercle of humerus. Capsule of shoulder joint.

ACTION

Initiates process of abductionat shoulder joint, so that deltoid can take over at later stages of abduction.Antagonists: infraspinatus, teres minor, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Belly: deep ache in regimental badge area (4–6 cm). Ellipseleads to zone of pain in lateral epicondyle/radial head. Diffuse pain into lateral forearm.

Insertion: localized zone of pain 5–8 cm over deltoid.

ADVICE

If you are feeling pain in your Rotator Cuff area:

Avoid heavy carrying. Avoid sleeping with arms above head.

REF: This information was sourced from Muscles of the body and their trigger points niel asher healthcare as the copyright 2014

 

Welcome To Muscle Of The Week!!

Sternocleidomastoid-

  • Origin

Sternum and Clavicle

  • Insertion                            

Temporal bone (mastoid process)

  • Primary Actions

Flexes neck and Laterally rotates head. 

Contraction of both sides together: flexes neck and draws head forward, as in raising head from a pillow. Raises sternum, and consequently ribs, superiorly during deep inhalation.

Contraction of one side: tilts head toward same side. Rotates head to face opposite side (and also upward as it does so). 

  • REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Sternal head: pain in occiput, radiating anteriorly to eyebrow, cheek, and throat (eye and sinus). Clavicular head: frontal headache, earache, mastoid pain (dizziness and spatial awareness). 

Ref:

Essentials of human Anatomy & Physiology, Elaine Marieb

Muscles of the Body and their Trigger Points , Niel Asher 

 

Monday Muscle Of The Week Levator Scapulae

Welcome to MUSCLE OF THE WEEK this week is going to be the LEVATOR SCAPULAE.

The Levator scapulae is deep to the SCM and the trapezius. It is named after its action of elevating the scapula.

INDICATIONS

Stiff and painful neck with limited rotation of cervical spine, long-term use of walking stick, neck pain and stiffness, problems turning neck (e.g. driving).

CAUSES

RTA, holding telephone ear to shoulder, side sleeping with wrong pillows, backpacks, poor posture, sustained habits or occupation, TV/monitor position, stress and tension, cold/flu or cold sores, sports (swimming front crawl).

ORIGIN

Posterior tubercles of transverse processes of first three or four cervical vertebrae (C1–C4).

INSERTION

Medial (vertebral) border of scapula between superior angle and spine of scapula.

ACTION

Elevates scapula. Helps retract scapula. Helps bend neck laterally.

NERVE

Dorsal scapular nerve, C4, 5, and cervical nerves, C3, 4.

BASIC FUNCTIONAL MOVEMENT

Example: carrying a heavy bag.

REFERRED PAIN PATTERNS

Triangular pattern from top of scapula to nape of neck. Slight overspill to medial border of scapula and posterior glenohumeral joint.

Ref: This information was sourced from Muscles of the body and their trigger points niel asher healthcare as the copyright 2014

Available Appointments

Tuesday 4.7.17- 10am and 3:30pm

Wednesday 5.7.17- 4pm and 5 pm

Thursday 6.7.17- 11am and 3pm

Friday- booked

Why Drink Water?

Why I ask my clients to drink water before and after a massage!!!

 

Massage treatments can cause you to become dehydrated.

When your muscles are healthy(hydrated) they feel soft, almost spongy and allows blood to flow freely throughout the vessels.  

Unhealthy(de-hydrated) muscle tissue is the type that is causing you pain. It is tight, feeling more compact and restricted in movement. It also restricts the amount of blood flow and lymphatic drainage through the tissue by constricting the capillaries. If you are not getting a good amount of blood flow through an area, this decreases oxygen and nutrient exchange, as well as allowing metabolic waste to build up and become stuck within the tissue. 

During a massage treatment these areas with tightness and limited range of motion are the main focal points, the therapist will aim to break up the adhesions (toxins) that have formed, allowing increased blood flow, increased movement, and to restore the muscle. What happens when you open up these areas where the toxins had been trapped due to lack of blood flow? It is now released and on its way out through the lymphatic system. Surrounding every cell in our body is a liquid called interstitial fluid, made up of mostly water.  Within that interstitial fluid is metabolic waste that needs to be transported back to the blood stream in order to be filtered through the kidneys. Massage is pushing, and moving this fluid around, and causing everything to happen at a faster rate. An increased amount of metabolic waste is being processed and filtered through the kidneys, which makes them have to work harder and is also using more water.  If you have ever experienced a feeling of nausea, headache, or flu like symptoms after a massage, this is due to the increased amount of metabolic waste being transported out. Drinking more water after your massage can help reduce those symptoms, or even stop it from happening.

 

 

Top 10 Benefits of Drinking Water: Don't Medicate, Hydrate!

1. Increases Energy & Relieves Fatigue: Since your brain is mostly water, drinking it helps you think, focus, concentrate better and be more alert. As an added bonus, your energy levels are also boosted!

2. Natural Headache Remedy: Helps relieve and prevent headaches and migraines which are commonly caused by dehydration.

4. Promotes Weight Loss: Removes by-products of fat, reduces eating intake as most of the time we think we are hungry but we are really just thirsty, reduces hunger, raises your metabolism and has zero calories!

3. Flushes Out Toxins: Gets rid of metabolic waste through sweat and urination which reduces the risk of kidney stones and UTI’s (urinary tract infections).

4. Promotes Weight Loss: Removes by-products of fat, reduces eating intake as most of the time we think we are hungry but we are really just thirsty, reduces hunger, raises your metabolism and has zero calories!

5. Maintains Regularity: Aids in digestion as water is essential to digest your food and prevents constipation.

6. Boosts Immune System: A water drinker is less likely to get sick. And who wouldn’t rather feel healthy the majority of the time? Drinking plenty of water helps fight against flu and chronic health conditions.

7. Improves Skin Complexion: Moisturizes your skin, keeps it fresh, soft, glowing and smooth. Gets rid of wrinkles. It’s the best anti-aging treatment around!

8. Prevents Cramps & Sprains: Proper hydration helps keep joints lubricated and muscles more elastic so joint pain is less likely.

9. Helps Mood: When the body is functioning at its best, you will feel great and be happy!

10. Save Money: Water is FREE! Even if you choose bottled/filtered water, it’s STILL cheaper than that high sugar and fat-filled latte!